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this in the predicament that we have are the entitlements, medicaid, medicare, social security to a lesser degree, but we have to address the entitlements. >> in what is the libertarian position on not? >> well, and promising to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is not promising a balanced budget. that's to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013, believing that if we don't reduce government expenditures by $1.4 trillion, that we'll find ourselves in the midst of a monetary collapse in a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have aren't worth anything. and that's going to be the consequence of us continuing to borrow and print money to the tune of 43 cents out of every dollar. >> governor gary johnson is the author of this book, "seven principles of good government: liberty, people and politics." he's also the libertarian candidate for president. what other issues you write about in this? >> well, this being kind of a background on my history. i've been a much greater were my entire life. i started a one-man handyman business in albuquerque in 1874 a
are talking about ends and means. the ends is noble. medicare, lyndon johnson said it's the job of government to take care of the bent and the ill. the bent means the old, the aged. his methods are route -- ruth ruthless, cruel, and sometimes hard to write about. the life of johnson, the means he used to accomplish them are really an examination of the relationship between ends and means. it's not a simple answer to it. >> host: and we are talking here with robert caro at the national book festival. in april, the years of lyndon johnson, passage of power came out, the fourth in the series on lbj, and the next call for him comes from don in new haven, connecticut. don, you're on booktv. >> caller: thanks. hi, mr. chairman caro. it's a pleasure to talk to you. >> guest: hello. >> caller: quick question. would we have medicare and medicaid today if not for johnson? >> guest: i'll say ton that particular -- i'll say on that particular question, that's really a major thing i examined in the book i'm writing now, and i have not done -- i have not finished it. i have not even finished the think com
and shoot grandma says she can't take any more medicare and roth a cliff or something like that. they're very positive reforms. i mention cell phone. why can we get back the same creativity in health care to create more health care. they get the agriculture, but then we have no more obesity. they'll be serving. in terms of food, without agriculture produce the food, companies process the food, deliver the food. casinos and restaurants and supermarkets and grocery stores sell the food to everything from food banks to food stamps to do with it. why can we do this thing and health care so people get the basics and get real free markets? i live in new jersey. you got me going on this. this is immoral. i can buy a perfectly good health insurance policy, even less than wisconsin. i can buy a car, but not the insurance. want to open up nationwide shopping and get hundreds of companies competing. alastair to change a health care is delivered, but the patient in charge comes up with ways of getting more availability and health insurance. there's exciting ways to do for people with chronic cond
that they have 100 days to reform medicare, reform social security, got to get spending under control, and it can't be like business as usual. they will be tempted to do that. republicans hold meetings and think about it a long time. they can't do that. they absolutely have to come out of the gate, blasting for reform, they have to rebuild the military, get the 313 chips, restore the terrible cuts the put in place. if they do it, democrats screams, the media screams, but the american people applaud and will be rewarded with a long period of time in time and power. if not, we'll go home. mitt romney will have the same problem obama had. he made the same promises. he's got to live up to them, a reform that obama made. i'm hoping that when we gather hen a year from now, that we'll have a set of prompts delivered upon, and maybe a new book. now, one last thing -- [laughter] i said they'd spend $2 billion in search of a million votes. i think the obvious thing is to buy a million copies of "the brief against obama" and leave them around the state; right? giving that i don't think the romney campaign d
indexed social security, having enacted supplemental social security, ssi, medicaid and medicare, the elderly the are least poor in the country, and the group, i'm not surprising you, that is the poorest are children. why? because children have parents, and this is largely a story about women. women and children. they are the poorest group. now, that job, that $34,000 job pays almost the same amount that it did in 1973 #. it's only gone up. if you take inflation intoing the. it's just gone up by 7% in the 8 years last year for which i've got numbers is 2011, only gone up 7% less than a fifth of 1% per year. it's really astonishing. did the country not -- did the economy not grow? well, of course it grew. all of that growth has stuck at the very top. 1%, 99%, absolutely. that's -- that is story number one that we need to have in mind in understanding why we're stuck, why there's so many people who are having such a tough time, and it goes all the way down into people who are working hard and can't even get out of poverty. second point in the terms of the story of the situation tha
government for social security and medicare. one trend is that the unions are turning from organizations that represent their members and contracting company gushy shins and to and grievances into lobbying organizations. and as our nanny state which heritage helps fight against so well becomes more commonplace, it will be easier for government to force groups of americans to accept for slobbing on their behalf, just like a force american workers to accept forest representation now. think about it my friends. the 20.5 billion government employees, these unions are already representing 41% but there are tens of millions of americans who receive some form of benefit or entitlement from government who can also be unionized with the few tweets of the law. imagine how much more income could be generated by representing them. i don't know if you all realize this but for every million worker there is about it really in dollars for shadowbosses. every million worker, there is a billion-dollar in dues to support political activities and help leftist organizations. for the past half-century, govern
by supporting a middle-class, preserving and strength and in social security, strengthening medicare? or will that just simply marginalizes further? >> it would be nice to have a real contrast between the parties. however, i think there are anti-seaton problems such as the avalanche of money in politics, which impels those parties to be money grabbers, to spend coming in now, anywhere from 40% of their time in congress to dialing for dollars and going to fundraisers. and every time a politician is either be elected or retires, he says, i hate the money chase. they all hate it, that they are trapped in the system. >> so what should we do? >> get the money out of politics. and it would also help if we had something other than this crazy system we have in this country, unlike most modern democracies, where you get state legislatures drawing the district lines in congress. all it does is create safe democrat and safe republican districts. it furthers the polarization of the country. >> so the next question. i would like to know where fna plays in the pantheon of republican transactions c
for medicaid, which is medicare -- are people, medicaid is for people, and they said that the cure was to corser. they said that states were turning it down and it was too great and that was a violation of states rights. you know, medicaid -- not every state adopted medicaid right away. arizona was the last state to adopt medicaid in 1982. there was no medicaid in arizona until 1982. the people i know who know this issue best suited in all these governors, they are talking big now. we are going to turn us on turning down this morning. and they have hospitals and doctors coming to them saying, are you insane leaving all of these billions of dollars on the table? it will start to be people in states that come around. particularly, after 2010, all of these states including this one, it may be a somewhat slow process. >> i thought i would test your predictive powers in wartime. a blog in the new yorker about the defense of marriage act in the way it would be viewed. i thought that would be an interesting thing to bring up the math well, it is really a fascinating moment. because there
for medicaid, which is medicare is older people, medicaid is poor people. and they said they cared was too coercive. they said the stakes were -- returning it and was too great so that was a violation of states right. you know, medicaid was, not every state adopted medicaid right away. arizona was the last state to adopt medicaid in 1982. medicaid passed in the 1960s and there is no medicaid 19 -- in arizona until nine team 82. all these governors are talking big now, we are going turn down this money. we don't want the strings attached. but when they want to start balancing their budgets and when they have hospitals and doctors come to them sing, are you insane living all these billions of dollars on the table? there will start to be people, people, the states will come around but they may not all come around at first. and particularly after 2010 we're all these states including this one included republicans, it may be a somewhat slow process. >> i thought i would test your particular powers one more time. you have a blog, i think was a blog entry in "the new yorker" about the defense of
and especially medicare, and unless and until we find ways to reform those programs to make them more affordable, we're going to continue to have trouble, both abroad and at home. >> host: and the last call for our two guests comes from bill in california. first of all, bill, where in california are you, and then go ahead and ask your question. >> caller: marina del ray. >> host: thank you. >> caller: okay. i never hear discussed what, to me, is clearly and obviously the real problem in the country. i like to paraphrase james' old saying in the election of 1992, it's the economy, stupid. it's the culture stupid. the culture of america is changing for the worse, and we see it in our terrible, competitiveness ratings, you know, with the foreign countries in math, science, ect. it's not hard to make chose changes. politically, it will be very difficult, but it's really quite cheap, and nobody ever talks about the kinds of things we have to do, and it's not putting more money into education, ect.; it's getting the kids to want to learn. if they want to learn, we could spend half of what we spend and
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10